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VSVS in Mr. P's Class!




Mr. P's Class
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Lesson #1
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Lesson #2
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Lesson #3
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Lesson #4
[PHOTOS]:
Lesson #1
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Lesson #2
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Lesson #3
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Lesson #4
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October 2017


Lesson #1: Oct. 2
ELECTROLYSIS:
https://www.britannica.com/science/electrolysis
Electrolysis, process by which electric current is passed through a substance to effect a chemical change. The chemical change is one in which the substance loses or gains an electron (oxidation). The process is carried out in an electrolytic cell, an apparatus consisting of positive and negative electrodes held apart and dipped into a solution containing positively and negatively charged ions. The substance to be transformed may form the electrode, may constitute the solution, or may be dissolved in the solution. If the substance to be transformed is the electrode, the reaction is generally one in which the electrode dissolves by giving up electrons. Hydrogen and oxygen are produced by the electrolysis of water.
Lesson #2: Oct. 16
ELECTRICITY:
--A series circuit only has one pathway for the electric current a break in the circuit stops all flow of electric current.
--A parallel circuit has multiple pathways for the electric current to travel a break in one pathway will still allow the current to go through the other pathway.

--Static electricity is the build-up of electrical charge. It does not flow. Lightning is an example of static electricity being “discharged” after having been built up.
--Current electricity is moving electrical charge, usually electrons. Some materials have more “free” electrons than others. Current electricity flows through a completed circuit.
Lesson #3: Oct. 23

Electricity flows through some materials better than others. Materials are classified as conductors, insulators as well as nonconductors or semiconductors.
---Conductors are materials that allow the movement of electrons through them. Metals have many “free” electrons that can easily move, and therefore are good conductors.  “Free” electrons are those not strongly held by the atom’s nucleus. Since they are not strongly held, they are able to “jump”from one atom to another. Wires used for electric circuits are usually made out copper wire, but other materials also conduct electricity.
---Insulators resist the flow of electricity, meaning electrons do not flow through them.  Some examples of insulators are Styrofoam, plastic (e.g., the casing around electrical wires), and glass.
---Semiconductors allow small currents to flow. Sometimes they are conductors and sometimes they are insulators. Silicon is the material most often used in making semiconductors.

Lesson #4: Oct. 30
DEEP OCEAN CURRENTS:
1. Water with a higher density sinks while lower density rises.
2. Warm air rises and cool air sinks.
DENSITY:
1. Density refers to the amount of mass per square unit.
2. Salinity is dissolved particles in liquid
3. In an estuary, the salinity rate is less dense than in salt water.
COMETS:
1. Comets orbit the sun beyond the Kuiper Belt.
2. Comets contain ice and space dust. They have ion or dust tails.
3. Asteriods and meteoriods are smaller and rock.
ENERGY:
1. Potential energy increases as height and mass increase.
2. Kinetic energy increases as potential energy decreases.
Meigs Magnet School: Room 213 Meigs Magnet School


VSVS!

Videos:


10.17.16:
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[video #3]
[video #4]
[video #5]
[video #6]


10.24.16:
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Videos:


10.31.16:
[video #16]
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[video #19]
[video #20]
Videos:


Fall 2017 videos coming soon.